How can Moving More help me? What the research says

How does Moving More impact your cancer outcomes, affect your quality of life, or impact your body terrain? We present the evidence.

For information and guidance on adding physical activity to your life, see these pages:

We strongly emphasize that Moving More by itself will not prevent, cure or control cancer or prevent recurrence. Like every other therapy or approach included on this website, Moving More is one component of an individualized integrative plan rather than a stand-alone therapy.

We summarize the clinical evidence for each medical benefit here. We begin with our assessment of the strength of evidence within each category, followed by a brief summary of individual studies or reviews of several studies. In assessing the strength of evidence, we consider the study design, number of participants, and the size of the treatment effect (how much outcomes changed with treatment).

Learn more about how we research and rate therapies and practices.

Improving treatment outcomes

Is Moving More linked to improved survival? Is it linked to less cancer growth or metastasis? Does it enhance the anticancer action of other treatments or therapies? We present the evidence.

The relationship between activity and survival becomes complex as people have more advanced disease or illness. People who are very ill may not be able to move much at all, but we wouldn’t conclude that more activity would delay death. However, evidence shows that even with advanced cancer, increasing activity within your limits is linked to better survival.

Similarly, pushing yourself to high levels of activity during treatment may not be wise. Guidelines encourage you to be as active as available given your situation. Follow your doctor’s recommendations, and also listen to your body’s need for rest.

Cancer as a whole

Good evidencesignificant effects in one large or several mid-sized and well-designed clinical studies (RCTs with an appropriate placebo or other strong comparison control or observational studies that control for confounds (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of moderately better survival among people with higher activity levels after diagnosis

Modest evidenceat least three small but well-designed RCTs, or one or more well-designed, mid-sized clinical studies of reasonably good quality (RCTs or observational studies), or several small studies aggregated into a meta-analysis found no effect (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of possibly better chemotherapy completion rates, but no evidenceoverall, one or more studies did not demonstrate that a treatment or intervention led to an expected outcome; this does not always mean that there is no effect in clinical practice, but that the studies may have been underpowered (too few participants) or poorly designed. Larger, well-designed studies provide more confidence in making assessments. of improved response rate or survival among people with cancer participating in aerobic exercise during chemotherapy

Advanced cancer

Preliminary evidencesignificant effects in small or poorly designed clinical studies OR conflicting results in adequate studies but a preponderance of evidence of an effect (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of better survival among people with more physical activity

Breast cancer

Strong evidenceconsistent, significant effects in several large (or at least one very large) well designed clinical studies or at least two meta-analyses of clinical studies of moderate or better quality (or one large meta-analysis) finding similar results (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of moderately better survival among people with higher activity levels compared to low levels

Good evidence of moderately better survival among people increasing their activity levels after diagnosis

Preliminary evidence of better cancer-specific survival among people with any level of physical activity after a breast cancer diagnosis

Colorectal cancer

Strong evidence of moderately better survival among people participating in more physical activity

Strong evidence of moderately better survival among people who increased their physical activity after diagnosis

Modest evidence of moderately higher mortality among people with high levels of sedentarycharacterized by much sitting and little physical exercise time

Lymphoma

Good evidence of better survival among people with higher physical activity after a lymphoma diagnosis

Modest evidence of better survival among people participating in physical activity before diagnosis

Prostate cancer

Strong evidence of improved survival and reduced disease progression among people with prostate cancer with higher levels of physical activity after diagnosis

No evidenceoverall, one or more studies did not demonstrate that a treatment or intervention led to an expected outcome; this does not always mean that there is no effect in clinical practice, but that the studies may have been underpowered (too few participants) or poorly designed. Larger, well-designed studies provide more confidence in making assessments. of a change in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) among men with prostate cancer participating in resistance exercise in a combined analysis of studies

Optimizing your body terrain

Does Moving More promote an environment within your body that is less supportive of cancer development, growth or spread? We present the evidence.

Blood sugar and insulin resistance

Good evidencesignificant effects in one large or several mid-sized and well-designed clinical studies (RCTs with an appropriate placebo or other strong comparison control or observational studies that control for confounds (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of better insulin balance among people with cancer as a whole participating in physical activity

Strong evidenceconsistent, significant effects in several large (or at least one very large) well designed clinical studies or at least two meta-analyses of clinical studies of moderate or better quality (or one large meta-analysis) finding similar results (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of some better markers of insulin balance and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) among people with breast cancer with higher levels of physical activity

Strong evidence of better insulin balance among people with colorectal cancer with higher levels of physical activity

Hormone imbalance

Preliminary evidencesignificant effects in small or poorly designed clinical studies OR conflicting results in adequate studies but a preponderance of evidence of an effect (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of better levels of leptin among people with or at high risk of breast cancer participating in physical activity, but only among those with overweight or obesity

Modest evidencesignificant effects in at least three small but well-designed RCTs, or one or more well-designed, mid-sized clinical studies of reasonably good quality (RCTs or observational studies), or several small studies aggregated into a meta-analysis (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of lower cortisol levels (a marker of stress) among people with major depressive disorder participating in exercise

Immune function

Preliminary evidence of better immune function among previously inactive women with breast cancer participating in an exercise intervention

Inflammation

Preliminary (conflicting) evidence of lower inflammation among people with cancer participating in physical activity

Oxidation

Good evidence of lower markers of oxidationa process in which molecules combine with oxygen or lose electrons; losing an electron creates unstable free radicals that can damage cells, causing illness and aging among people exercising

Your microbiome

Modest evidence of healthier microbiota among healthy people with higher levels of physical activity

Vitamin D levels

Modest evidence of higher risk of low vitamin D levels among people with low levels of physical activity

Managing side effects and promoting wellness

Is Moving More linked to fewer or less severe side effects or symptoms? Is it linked to less toxicity from cancer treatment? Does it support your quality of life or promote general well-being? We present the evidence.

Treatment side effects as a whole

Modest evidence of less toxicity and better completion rates during chemotherapy among people participating in exercise

Anxiety

Strong evidenceconsistent, significant effects in several large (or at least one very large) well designed clinical studies or at least two meta-analyses of clinical studies of moderate or better quality (or one large meta-analysis) finding similar results (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of a small improvement in anxiety among people participating in exercise without regard to treatment phase

Good evidencesignificant effects in one large or several mid-sized and well-designed clinical studies (RCTs with an appropriate placebo or other strong comparison control or observational studies that control for confounds (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of slightly less anxiety among people participating in exercise during chemotherapy, radiotherapy, adjuvant therapytreatment applied after initial treatment for cancer, especially to suppress secondary tumor formation, or hormone therapy

Strong evidence of small to moderate improvement in anxiety among people participating in exercise after cancer treatment

No evidence of an effectoverall, one or more studies did not demonstrate that a treatment or intervention led to an expected outcome; this does not always mean that there is no effect in clinical practice, but that the studies may have been underpowered (too few participants) or poorly designed. Larger, well-designed studies provide more confidence in making assessments. on anxiety among adults with advanced cancer participating in exercise in a combined analysis of studies

Body composition or cachexia

Strong evidence of less body fat and more lean body mass among people with cancer participating in exercise without regard to treatment phase

Good evidence of increased lean body mass and less body fat or obesity during neoadjuvanttherapy used before a main treatment, such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and hormone therapy before surgery or adjuvanttreatment applied after initial treatment for cancer, especially to suppress secondary tumor formation chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or hormone therapy, including androgen deprivation therapy, among people participating in exercise

Good evidence of more lean muscle mass among people participating in exercise, especially resistance training

Breathlessness (dyspnea)

Strong evidence of less breathlessness among people participating in aerobic, resistance, or both types of exercise without regard to treatment phase

Good evidence of less breathlessness among people with most advanced cancer types participating in physical activity

No evidence of an effect on breathlessness among people with advanced lung cancer participating in exercise in a combined analysis of studies

Good evidence of less breathlessness among people participating in exercise training before or after lung resection surgery

Cardiovascular symptoms

Therapies and practices that improve cardiovascular health and reduce the decline in cardiovascular function from some treatments deserve special attention from people with cancer.

Strong evidence of better cardiovascular fitness or function among people with breast cancer participating in exercise

Preliminary evidence of less decline in cardiovascular function among people with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant treatment, and in particular among those receiving chemotherapy, with exercise training

Changes in appetite

No evidence of an effect of exercise on appetite among people with cancer in combined analyses of studies

Cognitive difficulties

Modest evidence of better cognitive scores among people with breast cancer participating in exercise

Preliminary evidence of better cognitive scores among people with grades 2–3 brain cancer (glioma) participating in an exercise program

Depression

Strong evidence of less depression among people participating in exercise without regard to treatment phase

Preliminary (conflicting) evidence of less depression among people participating in exercise during cancer treatment

Good evidence of less depression among people participating in exercise after cancer treatment

No evidence of an effect on depression among adults with advanced lung cancer participating in exercise training in a combined analysis of studies

Fatigue

Good evidence of less cancer-related fatigue among people participating in exercise without regard to treatment phase

Strong evidence of less cancer-related fatigue during treatment among people participating in exercise

Strong evidence of less cancer-related fatigue among people participating in exercise after treatment

Insufficient (conflicting) evidence of an impact on fatigue among people with advanced cancer participating in exercise

Gastrointestinal symptoms

No evidence of an impact of exercise on nausea and vomiting, constipation, or diarrhea in a combined analysis of studies

Lymphedema

Strong evidence of less lymphedema among people doing either aerobic and resistance exercise

No evidence of benefit for breast cancer-related lymphedema among people participating in aquatic exercise in a combined analysis of studies

Neurological symptoms

Good evidence of better balance, nerve conduction velocity, quality of life, and neuropathy-induced symptoms, and quicker movement initiation among people with peripheral neuropathydamage to the peripheral nerves outside the brain and spinal cord participating in exercise interventions

Pain

Good evidence of less pain among people with many types of cancer, but not lung cancer, participating in exercise without regard to treatment phase

Good evidence of less pain during cancer treatment except insufficient evidence regarding aromatase inhibitor-associated joint pain

Preliminary evidence of less pain among women recovering after breast cancer surgery participating in 12 months of physical activity

Physical function and quality of life

Good evidence of better quality of life, fitness, and strength among people with cancer participating in exercise without regard to treatment phase

Good evidence of better fitness, strength, and quality of life among people participating in exercise during treatment, except not among people with shoulder dysfunction due to treatment for head and neck cancer

Good evidence of better strength, fitness, and quality of life among people participating in exercise after treatment

Preliminary (conflicting) evidence of better quality of life, strength, and physical function among people with advanced cancers participating in exercise

Sexual difficulties

Modest evidence of better sexuality among people participating in exercise

Modest evidence of better sexual function among women with cervical cancer participating in pelvic floor muscle training as part of a package of interventions

Modest evidence of better sexual function with exercise among people with prostate cancer receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT)

Preliminary evidence of greater sexual activity but no impact on sexual function among people with prostate cancer as a whole participating in exercise

Sleep disruption

Strong evidence of less sleep disruption and better sleep without regard to treatment among people participating in exercise

Strong evidence of better sleep among people participating in exercise, especially aerobic exercise, during treatment

Strong evidence of better sleep among people participating in exercise after treatment

Good evidence of less insomnia among people with advanced cancer participating in exercise

Other symptoms and side effects

Good evidence of more rapid recovery from surgery, shorter hospital stays, and substantially fewer complications from surgery among people participating in exercise training before surgery

Preliminary evidence of improved muscle mass among people participating in exercise before surgery

No evidence of an effect on coughing among people with lung cancer participating in exercise in a combined analysis of studies

Moving More as part of combination treatment

Pelvic floor muscle training with counseling and yoga or core exercises: modest evidence of better sexual function and health-related quality of life among people with cervical cancer participating in pelvic floor muscle training with counseling and yoga or core exercises

Symptoms not specific to cancer

Anxiety: modest evidence of less anxiety among people participating in physical activity, including people with anxiety and stress-related disorders

Cardiovascular symptoms: modest evidence of lower heart rates and blood pressure among students, and especially adolescents and young adults, participating in mind-body physical activity such as yoga, tai chi, or qigong

Gastrointestinal symptoms: modest evidence of fewer symptoms among people with symptoms of constipation participating in exercise

Pain not specific to cancer: good evidence of less pain among people participating in physical activity

Pain with surgery: preliminary evidence of less pain after surgery among people participating in total-body prehabilitation before surgery

Physical function and reported quality of life: good evidence of small and moderate improvements in physical function and reported quality of life among people with chronic pain participating in physical activity

Stress: modest evidence of lower physical markers of stress among people participating in exercise or movement

Reducing cancer risk

Is Moving More linked to lower risks of developing cancer or of recurrence? We present the evidence.

Cancer as a whole

Modest evidencesignificant effects in at least three small but well-designed RCTs, or one or more well-designed, mid-sized clinical studies of reasonably good quality (RCTs or observational studies), or several small studies aggregated into a meta-analysis (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of lower risk of recurrence among people participating in exercise

Strong evidenceconsistent, significant effects in several large (or at least one very large) well designed clinical studies or at least two meta-analyses of clinical studies of moderate or better quality (or one large meta-analysis) finding similar results (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of a lower risk of a cancer diagnosis among people with higher levels of physical activity

Strong evidence of lower cancer mortality among people without cancer at baseline and who had the highest levels of physical activity

Bladder cancer

Weak evidenceone or more case studies, supported by animal evidence OR small treatment effects of limited clinical significance OR studies with no controls OR weak trends of effects (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of lower risk of bladder cancer among people doing muscle-strengthening exercises

Breast cancer

Modest evidence of slightly lower risk of recurrence among people participating in higher levels of physical exercise

Strong evidence of a slightly lower risk of a breast cancer diagnosis among people participating in more physical activity

Strong evidence of a higher risk of breast cancer among people with more sitting time

Good evidencesignificant effects in one large or several mid-sized and well-designed clinical studies (RCTs with an appropriate placebo or other strong comparison control or observational studies that control for confounds (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of lower breast cancer mortality among people without cancer at baseline participating in higher levels of physical activity

Colorectal cancer

Preliminary evidencesignificant effects in small or poorly designed clinical studies OR conflicting results in adequate studies but a preponderance of evidence of an effect (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of moderately to substantially lower risk of recurrence of colon cancer with higher levels of exercise after diagnosis

Strong evidence of lower risk of colon cancer among people with higher levels of physical activity

Preliminary (conflicting) evidence of lower risk of rectal cancer among people with higher levels of physical activity

Strong evidence of higher risk of colon cancer or neoplasia among people with more sedentary (sitting) time

Gastrointestinal cancer

Strong evidence of lower risk of esophageal adenocarcinomas among people participating in physical activity as a whole, but not in occupational physical activity

Good evidence of lower risk of gallbladder cancer with higher levels of physical activity

Strong evidence of lower risk of liver cancer among people with higher levels of physical activity

Good evidence of lower risk of mortality from liver cancer among people without cancer at baseline participating in higher levels of physical activity

Strong evidence of lower risk of stomach cancer among people with higher levels of physical activity

Gynecological cancer

Good evidence of lower risk of endometrial cancer among people with higher levels of physical activity

Head, neck, and oral cancers

Good evidence of lower risk of oropharyngeal cancer among people with higher levels of physical activity

Kidney cancer

Strong evidence of lower risk of kidney cancer among people with higher levels of physical activity

Lung cancer

Modest evidence of lower risk of lung cancer among current and former smokers with higher levels of physical activity

Insufficient evidence of an effect on lung cancer risk among nonsmokers with higher levels of physical activity

Modest evidence of higher risk of lung cancer among men with high levels of occupational activity

Modest evidence of lower risk of lung cancer among males who smoked and who had moderate and moderate or high cardiorespiratory fitness compared to low fitness

Lymphoma

Good evidence of lower risk of lymphoma among people with higher levels of physical activity

Melanoma

Weak evidence of lower risk of melanoma among people with higher levels of physical activity compared to low levels, but only if exposure to UV radiation is not increased with activity

Myeloma

Good evidence of lower risk of myeloma among people with higher levels of physical activity

Ovarian cancer

Good evidence of lower risk of ovarian cancer among people with higher levels of physical activity and less sitting time

Pancreatic cancer

Strong evidence of lower risk of pancreatic cancer among people with higher levels of overall physical activity

Preliminary evidence of lower risk of pancreatic cancer among people with recreational activity

Weak evidence of a slightly higher risk of pancreatic cancer among people doing muscle-strengthening exercises

Prostate cancer

Weak evidence of a lower risk of prostate cancer recurrence among men with the highest levels of physical activity

Preliminary evidence of lower risk of prostate cancer among people with higher levels of physical activity

How Moving More relates to other healing practices and habits in cancer

Healthy lifestyle

Colorectal cancer

Good evidencesignificant effects in one large or several mid-sized and well-designed clinical studies (randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with an appropriate placebo or other strong comparison control or observational studies that control for confounds) (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of better survival among people with colorectal cancer following the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research recommended lifestyle behaviors

Prostate cancer

Good evidence of lower risk of lethal prostate cancer, but not overall prostate cancer, over 27 years among people with high genetic risk following a lifestyle of a healthy weight, vigorous physical activity, not smoking, and a healthy diet

Preliminary evidencesignificant effects in small or poorly designed clinical studies OR conflicting results in adequate studies but a preponderance of evidence of an effect (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of decreasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels among men with prostate cancer with a lifestyle intervention including a health-promoting diet, physical activity, group support, and stress management

Eating Well

Combining Moving More with Eating Well can increase the benefits, whether for cancer outcomes, for some body terrain factors, or for anxiety, depression, fatigue, or quality of life.

Breast cancer

Preliminary evidencesignificant effects in small or poorly designed clinical studies OR conflicting results in adequate studies but a preponderance of evidence of an effect (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of better survival and lower risk of relapse among people with breast cancer combining diet and exercise

Colorectal cancer

Preliminary evidence of better survival among people with colorectal cancer following diet and physical activity guidelines

Blood sugar imbalance and insulin resistance

Preliminary evidence of better insulin sensitivity and higher incidence of reduced diabetes medication among people with type 2 diabetes eating a vegetarian diet and participating in physical exercise

Weak evidenceone or more case studies, supported by animal evidence OR small treatment effects of limited clinical significance OR studies with no controls OR weak trends of effects (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of lower markers of glycemic imbalance among men with prostate cancer participating in a diet and an exercise program

Weak evidence of better markers of insulin growth factor among men participating in a diet and exercise program

Weak evidence of better markers of blood sugar and insulin among people participating in both diet and exercise

Body weight

Preliminary evidence of more of a decrease in body weight and both visceral and subcutaneous fat among people with type 2 diabetes eating a vegetarian diet and also participating in exercise

Weak evidence of better markers of body mass index and cardiorespiratory fitness among people with breast cancer participating in an intervention of nutrition and exercise

Hormone imbalance

Modest evidence of more benefits with breast cancer-related sex hormones among healthy, physically inactive postmenopausal women combining diet and exercise

Preliminary evidence of higher levels of adiponectin (important for regulating blood glucose, insulin sensitivity, and lipid metabolism) and lower levels of leptin (which inhibits hunger) among people with type 2 diabetes eating a vegetarian diet and participating in exercise

Inflammation

Weak evidence of better markers of inflammation among people with breast cancer participating in an intervention of nutrition and exercise

Anxiety

Good evidencesignificant effects in one large or several mid-sized and well-designed clinical studies (randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with an appropriate placebo or other strong comparison control or observational studies that control for confounds) (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of slightly less anxiety among people with cancer participating in a combined intervention of diet and physical activity

Depression

Preliminary evidence of less depression among women with early breast cancer participating in an intervention of both diet and exercise

Fatigue

Preliminary evidence of less fatigue among women with early breast cancer participating in an intervention of both diet and exercise

Physical function and quality of life

Modest evidence of much better physical function among people with head and neck cancer participating in an intervention of nutrition and exercise

Good evidence of slightly improved quality of life among people with cancer participating in both better diet and physical activity

Managing Stress

Lower physical markers of stress among people participating in exercise or movement, but not specific to people with cancer (modest evidence)

Sleeping Well

Less sleep disruption and better sleep among people participating in exercise without regard to treatment phase (strong evidence)

Better sleep among people participating in exercise, especially aerobic exercise, during treatment (strong evidence)

Better sleep among people participating in exercise after treatment (strong evidence)

Less insomnia among people with advanced cancer participating in exercise (good evidence)

Sharing Love and Support

For many people, sharing a physical activity—whether a yoga class, a walk on the beach, or dancing—with a loved one makes the activity a social event and often more pleasurable. Social physical activity may help a person with cancer enjoy Moving More even when their energy level is low. Practicing with a “purpose partner” may increase the likelihood that a person will maintain physical activity.

Keep reading

Authors

Nancy Hepp, MS

Lead Researcher and Program Manager
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Ms. Hepp is a researcher and communicator who has been writing and editing educational content on varied health topics for more than 20 years. She serves as lead researcher, program manager, and writer for CancerChoices. Her graduate work in research and cognitive psychology, her master’s degree in instructional design, and her certificate in web design have all guided her in writing and presenting information for a wide variety of audiences and uses. Nancy’s service as faculty development coordinator in the Department of Family Medicine at Wright State University also provided experience in medical research, plus insights into medical education and medical care from the professional’s perspective.

Nancy Hepp, MS Lead Researcher and Program Manager

Laura Pole, RN, MSN, OCNS

Senior Clinical Consultant
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Laura Pole is senior clinical consultant for CancerChoices. Laura is an oncology clinical nurse specialist who has been providing integrative oncology clinical care, navigation, consultation, and education services for over 40 years. She is the co-creator and co-coordinator of the Integrative Oncology Navigation Training at Smith Center for Healing and the Arts in Washington, DC. Laura also manages the “Media Watch Cancer News That You Can Use” listserv for Smith Center/Commonweal. In her role as a palliative care educator and consultant, Laura has served as statewide Respecting Choices Faculty for the Virginia POST (Physician Orders for Scope of Treatment) Collaborative as well as provided statewide professional education on palliative and end-of-life care for the Virginia Association for Hospices and Palliative Care.

For CancerChoices, Laura curates content and research, networks with clinical and organizational partners, brings awareness and education of integrative oncology at professional and patient conferences and programs, and translates research into information relevant to the patient experience as well as clinical practice.

Laura sees her work with CancerChoices as a perfect alignment of all her passions, knowledge and skills in integrative oncology care. She is honored to serve you.

Laura Pole, RN, MSN, OCNS Senior Clinical Consultant

Reviewers

Ted Schettler, MD, MPH

Physician, advocate, author, and CancerChoices advisor
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Dr. Schettler is science director of the Collaborative on Health and the Environment and the Science and Environmental Health Network and author of The Ecology of Breast Cancer. He has worked extensively with community groups and non-governmental organizations throughout the US and internationally, addressing many aspects of human health and the environment. He has served on advisory committees of the US EPA and National Academy of Sciences. He is co-author of Generations at Risk: Reproductive Health and the Environment, which examines reproductive and developmental health effects of exposure to a variety of environmental toxicants. He is also co-author of In Harm’s Way: Toxic Threats to Child Development, which discusses the impact of environmental exposures on neurological development in children, and Environmental Threats to Healthy Aging: With a Closer Look at Alzheimer’ and Parkinson’s Diseases.

Ted Schettler, MD, MPH Physician, advocate, author, and CancerChoices advisor

Whitney You, MD, MPH

Research Consultant
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Dr. You is a physician specializing in maternal-fetal medicine (MFM) with a specific interest in cancer in the context of pregnancy. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in health services research with a focus in health literacy and received a Master of Public Health.

Whitney You, MD, MPH Research Consultant

Andrew Jackson, ND

Research Associate
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Andrew Jackson, ND, serves as a CancerChoices research associate. As a naturopathic physician practicing in Kirkland, Washington, he teaches critical evaluation of the medical literture at Bastyr University in Kenmore, Washington. His great appreciation of scientific inquiry and the scientific process has led him to view research with a critical eye.

Andrew Jackson, ND Research Associate

Last update: December 1, 2022

Last full literature review: September 2021

CancerChoices provides information about integrative in cancer care, a patient-centered approach combining the best of conventional care, self care and evidence-informed complementary care in an integrated plan cancer care. We review complementaryin cancer care, complementary care involves the use of therapies intended to enhance or add to standard conventional treatments; examples include supplements, mind-body approaches such as yoga or psychosocial therapy, and acupuncture therapies and self-care lifestyle actions and behaviors that may impact cancer outcomes; examples include eating health-promoting foods, limiting alcohol, increasing physical activity, and managing stress practices to help patients and professionals explore and integrate the best combination of conventionalthe cancer care offered by conventionally trained physicians and most hospitals; examples are chemotherapy, surgery, and radiotherapy and complementary therapies and practices for each person.

Our staff have no financial conflicts of interest to declare. We receive no funds from any manufacturers or retailers gaining financial profit by promoting or discouraging therapies mentioned on this site.

 

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