Finding integrative oncologists and other professionals

At a glance

Several medical approaches are available in pursuing cancer care. Most people start with conventional medicine which includes chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, immunotherapy, and more, and is described in Choices in Conventional Care.  Within conventional medicine, you have key choices to make when selecting professionals, including whether to work with an integrative oncologist.

Beyond conventional care, many further choices are available in several distinct medical systems. Along with further information below on this page, We provide links to directories of professionals and practitioners for each of these medical systems.

Integrative medicine includes combining conventional medicine with evidence-based ccomplementaryin cancer care, complementary care involves the use of therapies intended to enhance or add to standard conventional treatments; examples include supplements, mind-body approaches such as yoga or psychosocial therapy, and acupuncture and lifestyle medicine. Integrative oncologists are trained in conventional medicine, with additional training in integrating conventional and complementary approaches. 

Naturopathic medicine emphasizes prevention, treatment, and optimal health through the use of therapeutic methods and substances. Naturopathic oncologists with a “FABNO” designation are licensed in naturopathic medicine as well as certified in naturopathic oncology care. They are skilled at collaborating with conventional oncologists to bring an integrative approach to your cancer care. These practitioners can prescribe natural therapies and lifestyle approaches as well as recommend and coordinate your use of other complementary therapies within their areas of training in collaboration with your primary oncologist. See Naturopathic medicine and professionals › below.

Functional medicine determines how and why illness occurs and restores health by addressing the root cause of disease. Functional medicine practitioners work especially to identify imbalances in nutrition, hormones, and other factors that drive disease. They may be conventionally trained physicians (MD or DO), or they may be nurse practitioners, physician assistants, or other health professionals. They most likely do not specialize in cancer care but would be able to bring an integrative perspective to your treatment. See Functional medicine and professionals › below.

Traditional medicine draws from centuries of experience and knowledge, often using local plants and natural substances to promote wellness and healing. Traditional medicine practitioners, such as within traditional Chinese medicine or Ayurveda, can bring added approaches and therapies to your cancer care. Many of these therapies are not typically used by naturopathic or functional physicians trained in Western approaches. See Traditional medicine and professionals › below.

Anthroposophic medicine pays equal attention to the body, soul, and spirit of the patient and includes a holistic understanding of humans and nature and of disease and treatment. It is integrated with conventional medicine in large hospitals and medical practices worldwide, but mostly in Europe. Anthroposophic health care is provided by medical doctors, therapists, and nurses. See Anthroposophic medicine and professionals › below. 

Homeopathic medicine is based on the theory that “like cures like”—a very small dose of a substance that causes a symptom in a healthy person may cure the illness. See Homeopathic medicine and professionals › below. 

In your community, you may also be able to find practitioners of specific therapies, such as acupuncture, massage, yoga, nutrition, physical therapy, and more. These therapies can assist with many side effects of cancer treatment and promote healing and wellness.

When selecting professionals, we recommend that you start by finding and narrowing your candidates for your primary oncology provider. But wherever you start, within each type of medical system that you plan to use, ideally you’ll want to find a professional who is willing to collaborate with professionals in your other chosen systems. You may be faced with trade-offs, as finding a collaborative dream team may not be realistic. Expect this to be a learning process—don’t expect to have all the information you need at the start.

What medical strategies are used in integrative oncology?

Throughout our discussion of integrativein cancer care, a patient-centered approach combining the best of conventional care, self care and evidence-informed complementary care in an integrated plan cancer care and therapies, we discuss four medical benefits:

  • Treating cancer
  • Optimizing your body terrain
  • Managing side effects and promoting wellness
  • Reducing risk of recurrence or of cancer

Different medical systems focus on each of these benefits to different degrees and with different approaches. You probably won’t find one approach or professional who is strong in all these areas. 

Conventional (Western) medicine is strongest in treating cancer, using mainly chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery, and immunotherapy. For managing side effects, the most common approach is prescription or over-the-counter medications.

Complementary medicine systems focus more on the other three medical benefits beyond treating cancer, although some complementary systems also have therapies that treat cancer effectively. Approaches include natural medicines from plants, minerals, and animals; mind-body and body-manipulation approaches; off-label drugs; involvement with your self-care practices; and other approaches.

The different complementary systems each have their own philosophy and principles. We’ll introduce you to these, but you’ll need to interview any professionals to understand their approaches and goals and determine if those align with yours.

You may need to start with one strategy, assess its strengths and weaknesses, and then find other approaches that will fill in some of those weaknesses. Most people start with conventional oncologists for their primary cancer care. 

Wherever you start, and within each type of medical system that you plan to use, ideally you’ll want to find a professional who is willing to collaborate with professionals in your other chosen systems. But you may be faced with trade-offs, as finding a dream team may not be realistic. Expect this to be a learning process—don’t expect to have all the information you need at the start.

Integrative professionals in conventional cancer care

We discuss conventional care and professionals in more detail in Choices in Conventional Care. We include our recommendations for sites with information about conventional treatments.

A small but growing number of conventionally trained oncology physicians have recognized the need for a holistic, integrative approach to cancer care. Known as integrative oncologists, they have received additional training in integrative medicine, traditional medicine, or other approaches. These physicians can vary greatly in their training and specialization, including their type of: 

  • The conventional training and specialization, such as radiation oncology or internal medicine
  • The cancer(s) they are skilled in treating; some generalize and others specialize in a specific cancer such as breast or colorectal
  • The integrative approach in which they have been trained, such as integrative medicine or traditional Chinese medicine
  • The integrative care that they provide, for example:
    • Whether they provide consultations on integrative approaches or the primary oncology care themselves
    • Their approach to complementary care, whether more conservative or more exploratory; some integrative oncologists may advise primarily on lifestyle approaches, incorporating supplements and mind-body practices, while others may support the use of off-label drugs

Similarly, hospitals, cancer centers, and cancer care clinics offer integrative approaches, but integrative programs can vary from one location to another. Some offer a modest level of integrative care while others offer more depth by providing therapies requiring greater practitioner knowledge and skill. These may include therapies involving greater risk, requiring closer supervision and monitoring.

Examples of degrees of integrative cancer care at hospitals, centers, and clinics:

  • Some may offer integrative cancer care with relatively light offerings such as yoga classes, dietary counseling, and perhaps some exercise classes.
  • Several more offer these plus acupuncture, a fuller range of mind-body therapiesapproaches that enhance your mind’s capacity to positively affect your body’s function and symptoms. Some interventions focus on calming your mind, improving focus, enhancing decision-making capacity, managing stress, or resolving conflict. Other interventions have a goal of relaxing both your mind and your body., massage therapy, and more. 
  • Few offer the full range of complementary therapies that we discuss on this site: natural products, herbs, supplements, off-label prescription drugs, targeted timing of therapy, and more.

See our database of National Cancer Institute-designated centers, where you can browse or search by location or by the types of integrative care offered.

Creating your cancer care team

If you choose an integrative approach, you may need to take some time to assess your options for physicians and other practitioners, which can vary according to your location.

Selecting a conventional oncologist will be a critical choice. Above all else, you want an oncologist who is skilled at caring for your specific cancer. If they are open to an integrative approach. that will be a plus. An integrative oncologist would be ideal in this role, but integrative oncologists are still rare. But if one is not available for you, and if you want to use an integrative approach to your care, you’ll want to check that your oncologist candidates are open to collaborating with your choice of integrative and complementary medicine professionals (many are described on the rest of this page).

If the best available oncologist for you is not open to collaborating, you may want to prioritize finding an integrative health professional trained in managing and combining conventional, complementary, and self-carelifestyle actions and behaviors that may impact cancer outcomes; examples include eating health-promoting foods, limiting alcohol, increasing physical activity, and managing stress approaches to cancer care. This person can oversee your choices to be sure you’re selecting complementary therapies wisely to coordinate with your conventional treatments.

Find integrative oncology professionals

University of Arizona Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Oncology

This center offers a Fellowship in Integrative Medicine and an IHeLp (Integrative Health and Lifestyle) program, and you can search among graduates.

Directory of graduates

Nancy’s List

Cancer survivor Nancy Novack has compiled a list of integrative professionals of all types. Search according to your interests.

Directory of Integrative Practitioners and Healing Centers

Oncology Association of Naturopathic Physicians (OncANP)

Look for the “Display only FABNO” button to look for a naturopathic physician board certified in naturopathic oncology.

Directory

Naturopathic medicine and professionals

“Naturopathic medicine is a distinct primary healthcare profession, emphasizing prevention, treatment, and optimal health through the use of therapeutic methods and substances that encourage individuals’ inherent self-healing process.”1American Association of Naturopathic Physicians. Definition of Naturopathic Medicine. Viewed February 5, 2018.

Naturopathy as a profession has developed a national/international evidence-informed oncology naturopathic residency and board certification system for physicians. “FABNO” after a physician’s name indicates she or he is a fellow of the American Board of Naturopathic Oncology (ABNO), which oversees board certification in naturopathic oncology. 

Naturopathic physicians (ND) who are not specifically trained and licensed in oncology may also be able to recommend and manage use of complementary therapies and practices, although they may not be as knowledgeable about use during conventional cancer treatments.

Naturopathic doctors or physicians are not universally licensed across the United States and Canada. The label “naturopath” may signify different qualifications in different places.

Some naturopathic doctors or physicians provide phone consultations, which can give you access if one is not available in your area.

Find naturopathic oncologists and physicians

Oncology Association of Naturopathic Physicians (OncANP)

Search for naturopathic physicians in the US and Canada.

Directory

Nancy’s List

Nancy Novack has compiled a list of integrative professionals of all types. Search for the term “naturopath” in the name field.

Directory of Integrative Practitioners and Healing Centers

Resources on naturopathic medicine

Functional medicine and professionals

“Functional medicine determines how and why illness occurs and restores health by addressing the root causes of disease for each individual.”2The Institute for Functional Medicine. What Is Functional Medicine? Viewed January 16, 2022.

The philosophy and approaches of functional medicine (FM) promote wellness, address many of the side effects of cancer and cancer treatments, and balance your body terrain. FM doesn’t address cancer specifically, but many FM physicians do treat cancer patients, primarily to support physiologic and metabolic balance both during and after cancer treatment.

FM uses a clinical practice approach based on the influence of epigenetic factors—environmental factors including diet and nutrition, toxics and lifestyle choices—on the development of chronic diseases.3IFM History. The Institute for Functional Medicine. Viewed January 15, 2022.

Find a functional medicine professional

Personal story

Laura Pole, RN, MSN, OCNS, CancerChoices senior clinical consultant: If I had cancer, what would I ask of my functional medicine  doctor?

If I were to get cancer now and need conventional oncology treatments, I would not have local access to an integrative oncologist. So what I would do is let the very competent local oncology center take care of the conventional side of treatment and pull in others to be part of my team. I am very fortunate to have a functional medicine-trained primary care doctor. Over my 20-plus years with her, she has helped get to the root of some complex medical problems and helped me resolve, or at least control, them. This has led to me having an extraordinary level of health and quality of life.

Should I ever have cancer, I would ask her to help me figure out if I had imbalances that could drive cancer processes and see how we bring them back into balance. In functional medicine, they call these the “Core Clinical Imbalances.” These core imbalances are very similar to what Dr. Keith Block and other integrative oncology practitioners call terrain imbalances, such as in immunity, inflammation, hormones, and others. I know she would want to look at “antecedents”,  that is, triggering events and mediators which may have played a role in causing, triggering or perpetuating my imbalances: Was I exposed to toxics in my environment growing up? Have I had significant stressors at vulnerable times? She would want to know my whole story, physical, mental, spiritual, not just about pieces and parts of my body. 

She once told me that for her patients with cancer who wish to include complementary therapies in their treatment, she suggests they buy the Moss Report › for their specific cancer. I appreciate her familiarity with this evidence-based resource and know we’re on the same wavelength.

Once I would complete conventional treatments, I’d ask my functional medicine doctor to help me regain balance as I recover from treatment. Finally, we would work for long-term health and remission maintenance, knowing that restoring balance in my body functions will likely prevent or at least stave off recurrence. Her functional medicine approach would fit right in with my idea of holistic integrative care: “Using the most natural means possible, including, but not limited to, diet (using a functional nutrition approach), nutritional supplements, botanicals, lifestyle changes, and if necessary, in specific cases, the limited use of pharmaceutical medications. In functional medicine, the whole person is addressed, not just a collection of symptoms.”4Cantor-Adkins SL. What is functional medicine? Viewed April 4, 2022.

This functional medicine approach is something I could live with, and it would give me something to live for.

Traditional medicine and professionals

Traditional Chinese medicine

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) comprises many components including acupuncture, qigong, bodywork therapy, Chinese herbs, and Five Elements Theory Diet. Evidence supports the use of many specific TCM therapies in cancer care to support or complement conventional treatments—especially chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery—mostly by managing side effects and improving your quality of life. 

Various certifications are available for TCM practitioners. These designations certify that a practitioner has undergone training and passed any certification requirements:

  • Diplomate of Oriental Medicine (Dipl OM)
  • Diplomate of Acupuncture (Dipl Ac)
  • Diplomate of Chinese Herbology (Dipl CH)
  • Diplomate of Asian Bodywork Therapy (Dipl ABT)

The term “traditional Chinese medicine” may be misleading, as this label is based on modern Western medical approaches and interpretations.

Some healthcare professionals, including Chinese medicine practitioners and licensed acupuncturists, argue that Chinese medicine practices cannot be studied and interpreted within the framework of Western research methods. Western methods may not provide a clear or complete evaluation of therapies used in this medical approach.

The term “classical Chinese medicine” is preferred by some to indicate a complete medical system guided by ancient classical texts and based on the traditional arts and practices of the naturalist philosophies of Daoism and Confucianism. In the introduction to Classical Chinese Medicine, Heiner Fruehauf states, “Classical Chinese Medicine represents a fervent call for respecting the art of Chinese medicine as a science in its own right.”5Lihong L. Classical Chinese Medicine. The Chinese University of Hong Kong. The Chinese University Press. 2019.

With deep respect for the traditions and philosophies of this ancient medical system, we use the terms traditional Chinese medicine and TCM, as these are used widely throughout North America and more familiar to our audience.

Several herbs and other therapies used in TCM are included in our reviews of therapies, which evaluate the evidence for medical benefits. Use in TCM is listed in the Expert use tab of each review. If you want to use Chinese herbal preparations, consult a certified clinician to help you find safe, quality preparations of remedies.

Caution is needed in using herbs prepared in Asia, as persistent reports of contamination of some herbal remedies by microbes, heavy metals, and/or DNA of undeclared plants or animals have surfaced over several years—sometimes a substantial percentage of those tested.6Ernst E. Toxic heavy metals and undeclared drugs in Asian herbal medicines. Trends in Pharmacological Sciences. 2002 Mar;23(3):136-9; Ting A, Chow Y, Tan W. Microbial and heavy metal contamination in commonly consumed traditional Chinese herbal medicines. Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine. 2013 Feb;33(1):119-24; Kim H, Hughes PJ, Hawes EM. Adverse events associated with metal contamination of traditional chinese medicines in Korea: a clinical review. Yonsei Medical Journal. 2014 Sep;55(5):1177-86; Coghlan ML, Maker G et al. Combined DNA, toxicological and heavy metal analyses provides an auditing toolkit to improve pharmacovigilance of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Scientific Reports. 2015 Dec 10;5:17475.

Find a TCM practitioner

Society for Integrative Oncology

Select “Traditional Oriental Medicine Practitioner” from the Primary Profession field.

Public Directory

Nancy’s List

Search for “Chinese” or “oriental” among the names of providers.

Directory of Integrative Practitioners and Healing Centers
Resources

Li X, Yang G et al. Traditional Chinese medicine in cancer care: a review of controlled clinical studies published in Chinese. PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e60338.

Ayurveda

Ayurvedic medicine is an ancient medical system originally from India. Ayurvedic medicine’s key concepts:7Ayurvedic Medicine: In Depth. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. December 2018. Viewed January 15, 2022.

  • Universal interconnectedness among people, health and the universe
  • The body’s constitution (prakriti)
  • Life forces and biologic factors (dosha)

Ayurvedic physicians prescribe individualized treatments of herbs or proprietary ingredients, massage, and lifestyle recommendations for diet, exercise, meditation, and other health practices.8Ayurvedic Medicine: In Depth. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. December 2018. Viewed January 15, 2022.

Several herbs and other therapies used in Ayurveda are included in our therapy reviews. Use in Ayurveda is listed in the Expert use tab of each review. Ayurvedic products have the potential to be toxic, as some contain lead, mercury, and/or arsenic in doses exceeding many guidelines.

Three levels of certification of Ayurvedic professionals are available in the United States: health counselor, practitioner and doctor.9National Ayurvedic Medical Association. NAMA Professional Educational Requirements. Viewed January 15, 2022. The US has no government-defined licensing or credentialing of Ayurvedic medicine.

Find an Ayurvedic provider

Society for Integrative Oncology

Select “Ayurvedic Medicine Practitioner” from the Primary Profession field.

Public Directory

Nancy’s List

Search for “Ayurveda” or “Ayurvedic” among the names of providers.

Directory of Integrative Practitioners and Healing Centers

Other traditional medicine systems

Many other traditional medical systems from every inhabited continent have their own philosophies and medicinal plants and therapies. Most have not been evaluated in published studies that we can access, and so we are not able to offer evidence or guidance on their appropriateness in cancer care.

Resources on traditional medicine

Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine

This book by Andrew Chevallier, FNIMH, provides an introduction to the herbs used in traditional medicine systems in Europe, India, China, Africa, Australia, North America, and South America.

Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine

Anthroposophic medicine and professionals

Anthroposophy is a medical system founded in 1920 but with deep roots in central European folk medicine. This integrativein cancer care, a patient-centered approach combining the best of conventional care, self care and evidence-informed complementary care in an integrated plan treatment system is based on a holistic understanding of man and nature and of disease and treatment. It builds on a concept of four levels of formative forces and on the model of a three-fold human constitution.

Anthroposophic health care is provided by medical doctors, therapists, and nurses and is integrated with conventionalthe cancer care offered by conventionally trained physicians and most hospitals; examples are chemotherapy, surgery, and radiotherapy medicine in large hospitals and medical practices worldwide, but mostly in Europe. It uses medicines derived from plants, minerals, and animals, plus massage, counseling, psychotherapy, and other specific techniques.10Kienle GS, Albonico H-U et al. Anthroposophic medicine: an integrative medical system originating in Europe. Global Advances in Health and Medicine. 2013 Nov; 2(6): 20-31. Anthroposophic hospitals in Germany and Switzerland combine use of conventional cancer care with intensive use of naturopathic, homeopathic, and anthroposophic remedies.

Mistletoe (Iscador) “originated within anthroposophic medicine. It is one of the most commonly prescribed complementary cancer therapies in central Europe and has been investigated intensely.”11Kienle GS, Albonico H-U et al. Anthroposophic medicine: an integrative medical system originating in Europe. Global Advances in Health and Medicine. 2013 Nov; 2(6): 20-31.

Find an anthroposophic medicine practitioner

Resources on anthroposophic medicine

Physicians’ Association for Anthroposophic Medicine

Conventional medicine professionals in the US and Canada can be certified in anthroposophic medicine.

Certification in Anthroposophic Medicine

Homeopathic medicine and professionals

Homeopathy is based on the theory that “like cures like”—a very small dose of a substance that causes a symptom in a healthy person may cure the illness. Homeopathic remedies are made from plant, mineral, and animal substances diluted in water repeatedly until there is little or none of the original substance left. Homeopaths believe that the original substance leaves a molecular blueprint in the water that triggers the body’s healing mechanisms. The water is used to make drops, pills, or creams.12Cancer Research UK. Homeopathy. Viewed April 8, 2022. In theory, a homeopathic dose enhances the body’s normal healing and self-regulatory processes.13WebMD. Homeopathy—Topic Overview. March 22, 2021. Viewed April 8, 2022.

The evidence to date for medical benefits of homeopathic therapies in cancer care is not strong.

Practitioners of homeopathy may be trained at independent schools and training programs. All naturopathic doctors or physicians receive training in homeopathy as a part of their education. Practitioners may pursue certification to validate their knowledge base. Homeopathy is regulated by individual state licensing boards.16Training & Practice. National Center for Homeopathy. Viewed April 8, 2022.

Find a homeopathic practitioner

Tips for selecting professionals

You may need to do some research to identify professionals that you’ll be comfortable with. 

First, find and narrow your candidates for your primary oncology physician.

  • Ask your existing healthcare team for recommendations.
  • Search directories from professional organizations (we list several in our descriptions of each medical system above)
  • Ask trusted friends and family members for recommendations.

Learn about your integrativein cancer care, a patient-centered approach combining the best of conventional care, self care, and evidence-informed complementary care in an integrated plan or complementaryin cancer care, complementary care involves the use of therapies intended to enhance or add to standard conventional treatments; examples include supplements, mind-body approaches such as yoga or psychosocial therapy, and acupuncture practitioner candidates. Visit their websites or call their offices to answer these questions before you visit:

  • What are their qualifications? How long have they practiced? Are they licensed or certified?
  • Do they care for people with cancer? How much of their practice involves people with cancer? Do they have experience in treating your cancer type?
  • Do they collaborate with conventional care professionals or provide conventional treatment? 
  • How much does treatment typically cost (total cost, or per session, or monthly) for people with cancer? Will costs be covered by your insurance?
  • Do they provide online/remote visits?

You might also ask family and friends about any experience they have with a practitioner you’re considering.

Interview a professional during a first visit:

Questions when selecting a conventionalthe cancer care offered by conventionally trained physicians and most hospitals; examples are chemotherapy, surgery, and radiotherapy medicine physician are contained within Making Skillful Decisions about Cancer Treatment.

For complementary professionals:

  • How will they assess your medical situation? How will progress be measured?
  • What types of treatments might they recommend? How do they keep current about new treatments, both conventional and complementary?
  • How would they expect to collaborate with your other professionals?

Once you have your primary professional, go through this same process to find professionals for other therapies and approaches you want to include in your treatment approach.

Keep reading about how to integrate your choices

Authors

Laura Pole, RN, MSN, OCNS

Senior Clinical Consultant
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Laura Pole is senior clinical consultant for CancerChoices. Laura is an oncology clinical nurse specialist who has been providing integrative oncology clinical care, navigation, consultation, and education services for over 40 years. She is the co-creator and co-coordinator of the Integrative Oncology Navigation Training at Smith Center for Healing and the Arts in Washington, DC. Laura also manages the “Media Watch Cancer News That You Can Use” listserv for Smith Center/Commonweal. In her role as a palliative care educator and consultant, Laura has served as statewide Respecting Choices Faculty for the Virginia POST (Physician Orders for Scope of Treatment) Collaborative as well as provided statewide professional education on palliative and end-of-life care for the Virginia Association for Hospices and Palliative Care.

For CancerChoices, Laura curates content and research, networks with clinical and organizational partners, brings awareness and education of integrative oncology at professional and patient conferences and programs, and translates research into information relevant to the patient experience as well as clinical practice.

Laura sees her work with CancerChoices as a perfect alignment of all her passions, knowledge and skills in integrative oncology care. She is honored to serve you.

Laura Pole, RN, MSN, OCNS Senior Clinical Consultant

Nancy Hepp, MS

Lead Researcher and Program Manager
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Ms. Hepp is a researcher and communicator who has been writing and editing educational content on varied health topics for more than 20 years. She serves as lead researcher, program manager, and writer for CancerChoices. Her graduate work in research and cognitive psychology, her master’s degree in instructional design, and her certificate in web design have all guided her in writing and presenting information for a wide variety of audiences and uses. Nancy’s service as faculty development coordinator in the Department of Family Medicine at Wright State University also provided experience in medical research, plus insights into medical education and medical care from the professional’s perspective.

Nancy Hepp, MS Lead Researcher and Program Manager

Miki Scheidel

Co-Founder and Creative Director
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Miki Scheidel is Co-founder and creative director of CancerChoices. She led the effort to transform Beyond Conventional Cancer Therapies, the prior version of CancerChoices, to its current form. Miki and her family were deeply affected by her father’s transformative experience with integrative approaches to metastatic kidney cancer. That experience inspires her work as president of the Scheidel Foundation and as volunteer staff at CancerChoices. She previously worked with the US Agency for International Development and Family Health International among other roles. She received her graduate degree in international development from Georgetown University, a graduate certificate in nonprofit management from George Mason University, and a Bachelor of Arts from Gettysburg College.

Miki Scheidel Co-Founder and Creative Director

Last update: May 24, 2022

CancerChoices provides information about integrative in cancer care, a patient-centered approach combining the best of conventional care, self care and evidence-informed complementary care in an integrated plan cancer care. We review complementaryin cancer care, complementary care involves the use of therapies intended to enhance or add to standard conventional treatments; examples include supplements, mind-body approaches such as yoga or psychosocial therapy, and acupuncture therapies and self-care lifestyle actions and behaviors that may impact cancer outcomes; examples include eating health-promoting foods, limiting alcohol, increasing physical activity, and managing stress practices to help patients and professionals explore and integrate the best combination of conventionalthe cancer care offered by conventionally trained physicians and most hospitals; examples are chemotherapy, surgery, and radiotherapy and complementary therapies and practices for each person.

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