How to Evaluate Trustworthiness of Websites on Complementary Cancer Therapies

How can you tell the sites with supportable claims from those that are less trustworthy?

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The Evidence House: Valuing What the Physician Sees in Practice

Interpreting study results involves assessing the trade-offs between highly controlled situations and relevance to real life, then using the evidence that makes the most sense in the situation.

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Why Randomized Controlled Trials Don’t Always Tell the Real-World Story

RCTs are not always the best approach to get definitive answers to clinical questions.

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Complementary Therapies and Cancer: How Much Evidence Is Enough?

We view the use of science-informed, low-risk, affordable therapies as a reasonable option for patients. Stronger evidence of benefit is needed for therapies that are risky, expensive, or otherwise burdensome.

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Understanding Research Studies

Evidence that a therapy “works” runs a whole range from unreliable to trustworthy. In this post, we consider the design of research studies.

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CancerChoices Complementary Therapy Reviews: Top-Rated on Quality and Trustworthiness

We received the highest rating among the sites evaluated for quality and trustworthiness of information on cancer complementary therapies, with a total score of 4.9/5.

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Vitamin D: Hit the Sweet Spot to Reduce Cancer Risk

Evidence so far shows a lower risk of many types of cancer among people with mid-range blood vitamin D levels compared to low levels. However, if your blood level is already in the middle range, taking vitamin D supplements might not bring much benefit regarding cancer risk. For men, if your vitamin D level is above about 35 ng/mL, more vitamin D could even be raising your risk of some types of cancer.

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Getting a Clear Picture of Research on Cancer Therapies

With scientific research, we get a little closer to the facts with each new discovery.

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Walk with Each Other:
Healing Circles

Studies show that I’m not alone in needing others to help me through cancer.

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