Vitamin C, available in several foods and dietary supplements, shows some anticancer effects, including better survival among people with breast cancer.

How can oral vitamin C help you? What the research says

We summarize the clinical evidence for each medical benefit here. We begin with our assessment of the strength of evidence within each category, followed by a brief summary of individual studies or reviews of several studies. In assessing the strength of evidence, we consider the study design, number of participants, and the size of the treatment effect (how much outcomes changed with treatment).

To see more details, click the plus sign to the right of any section.

Improving treatment outcomes

Is oral vitamin C linked to improved survival? Is it linked to less cancer growth or metastasis? Does it enhance the anticancer action of other treatments or therapies? We present the evidence.

Advanced cancer

Insufficient (conflicting) evidencepreclinical evidence only OR clinical studies with such poor or unclear methodology that no conclusion can be drawn OR conflicting findings across clinical studies with no preponderance of evidence in one direction; conflicting evidence occurs when studies find conflicting effects (positive effect vs no effect or negative effect) with the same treatment and the same general study population (same cancer type, for example) (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of an effect on survival among people with advanced cancer treated with vitamin C supplements

Preliminary evidencesignificant effects in small or poorly designed clinical studies OR conflicting results in adequate studies but a preponderance of evidence of an effect (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of a link between shorter survival, low vitamin C levels, and advanced cancer

Brain cancer

Preliminary evidence of better survival among people with grade 4 malignant glioma with higher intake of vitamin C in their diet

Breast cancer

Modest evidencesignificant effects in at least three small but well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs), or one or more well-designed, mid-sized clinical studies of reasonably good quality (RCTs or observational studies), or several small studies aggregated into a meta-analysis (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of better survival among women with breast cancer taking vitamin C supplements

Leukemia

No evidence of an effectoverall, one or more studies did not demonstrate that a treatment or intervention led to an expected outcome; this does not always mean that there is no effect in clinical practice, but that the studies may have been underpowered (too few participants) or poorly designed. Larger, well-designed studies provide more confidence in making assessments. on overall or relapse-free survival among people with acute myeloid leukemia with higher vitamin C levels in a small study

Preliminary evidence of better response to treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTis) among people with myeloid cancers treated with oral vitamin C

Vitamin C combined with other therapies

Modest evidence of slightly lower mortality among people taking vitamin C or other antioxidant supplements (vitamin E or multivitamin) after a breast cancer diagnosis

No evidence of an effect on response rates or survival after chemotherapy among people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with high-dose vitamins C, E and beta carotene in a small study

Weak evidenceone or more case studies, supported by animal evidence OR small treatment effects of limited clinical significance OR studies with no controls OR weak trends of effects (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of tumor response among people with multiple myeloma treated with bortezomib, oral ascorbic acid and melphalan

Preliminary evidence of better overall survival among people with acute myeloid leukemia and NPM1 mutations but no evidence of an effect among people with wild-type NPM1 treated with supplemental vitamin C and vitamin D

Preliminary evidence of lower markers of tumor proliferation among people with prostate cancer treated with vitamin K3 and vitamin C

Preliminary evidence of resolution of lesions among people with basal cell carcinoma treated with a topical solution of ascorbic acid and dimethyl sulfoxide

Weak evidence of normalization of CA-125 levels after cytoreduction surgery among 2 women with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer treated with oral vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, coenzyme Q-10, and a multivitamin/mineral complex, plus intravenous vitamin C in addition to chemotherapy

Optimizing your body terrain

Does oral vitamin C promote an environment within your body that is less supportive of cancer development, growth, or spread? We present the evidence.

See Optimizing Your Body Terrain ›

Find medical professionals who specialize in managing body terrain factors: Finding Integrative Oncologists and Other Practitioners ›

High blood sugar and insulin resistance

No evidence of an effectoverall, one or more studies did not demonstrate that a treatment or intervention led to an expected outcome; this does not always mean that there is no effect in clinical practice, but that the studies may have been underpowered (too few participants) or poorly designed. Larger, well-designed studies provide more confidence in making assessments. on blood sugar and insulin among people with type 2 diabetes treated with vitamin C overall, although weak evidenceone or more case studies, supported by animal evidence OR small treatment effects of limited clinical significance OR studies with no controls OR weak trends of effects (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of a possible effect at a dose of 1000 mg vitamin C per day

Preliminary evidencesignificant effects in small or poorly designed clinical studies OR conflicting results in adequate studies but a preponderance of evidence of an effect (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of a link between plasma vitamin C concentrations and type 2 diabetes or prediabetes

Immune function

Increased immune system activation is not always beneficial, so your oncology team needs to determine whether immune activation would be favorable in your situation.

Preliminary evidence of a higher marker of immune activity among acutely hospitalized patients treated with oral vitamin C

Preliminary evidence of lower levels of some markers of immune activity during multimodal treatment for esophageal adenocarcinoma among people treated with oral vitamin C

Weak evidenceone or more case studies, supported by animal evidence OR small treatment effects of limited clinical significance OR studies with no controls OR weak trends of effects (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of downregulation of immune activity (activated NF-κB and cytokines) among people with Barrett’s esophagus and specialized intestinal metaplasia treated with 1000 mg oral vitamin C

Preliminary evidence of less DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes among employees working at a thermal power plant treated with oral vitamin C (not specific to cancer)

Preliminary evidence of a link between neutrophil counts, febrile neutropenia, and low vitamin C levels during and after conditioning chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation among people with hematological cancer

Inflammation

Good evidencesignificant effects in one large or several mid-sized and well-designed clinical studies (randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with an appropriate placebo or other strong comparison control or observational studies that control for confounds) (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of lower levels of markers of inflammation among people treated with vitamin C

Preliminary evidence of a link between vitamin C levels and inflammation; the link likely works in both directions

Oxidative stress

Preliminary evidence of normalized levels of antioxidant enzymes during tamoxifen treatment among postmenopausal women with breast cancer treated with oral vitamin C

Preliminary evidence of lower oxidative stressan imbalance between free radicals and antioxidants in your body in which antioxidant levels are lower than normal; this imbalance can cause harmful oxidation reactions in your body chemistry after radionuclide therapy (RNT) among people with prostate cancer or neuroendocrine tumors treated with oral vitamin C before RNT

Your microbiome

Preliminary evidence of better markers of microbiomethe collection of microbes living on and within your body health (higher microbial alpha diversity and fecal short-chain fatty acids) among healthy volunteers treated with oral vitamin C

Other terrain factors

Preliminary evidence of higher plasma vitamin C levels and upregulation of several viral defense genes in malignant myeloid cells but not T cells during treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors among people with myeloid cancers treated with  oral vitamin C

Vitamin C combined with other therapies

Preliminary evidence of lower markers of oxidative stress among people treated with oral vitamin C, vitamin E, and sometimes with selenium

Weak evidence of less inflammation among people with cancer-related anorexiaabnormal loss of appetite, often leading to weight loss/cachexiaweakness and wasting of the body due to severe chronic illness and oxidative stress treated with a special diet, antioxidants, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and celecoxib

Managing side effects and promoting wellness

Is oral vitamin C linked to fewer or less severe side effects or symptoms? Is it linked to less toxicity from cancer treatment? Does it support your quality of life or promote general well-being? We present the evidence.

Side effects as a whole

Preliminary evidencesignificant effects in small or poorly designed clinical studies OR conflicting results in adequate studies but a preponderance of evidence of an effect (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of less toxicity and fewer cancer therapy delays after 6 months among children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia with higher vitamin C in their diets

Body composition and cachexia

Preliminary evidence of higher body weight during chemotherapy among people with acute myeloid leukemia treated with vitamin C supplements

Changes in appetite

No evidence of an effectoverall, one or more studies did not demonstrate that a treatment or intervention led to an expected outcome; this does not always mean that there is no effect in clinical practice, but that the studies may have been underpowered (too few participants) or poorly designed. Larger, well-designed studies provide more confidence in making assessments. on appetite among people with advanced cancer treated with high-dose oral vitamin C in a small trial

Oral symptoms

Weak (conflicting) evidenceone or more case studies, supported by animal evidence OR small treatment effects of limited clinical significance OR studies with no controls OR weak trends of effects (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of better salivary flow after radiotherapy among people with head and neck cancer treated with chewable ascorbic acid tablets

Good evidencesignificant effects in one large or several mid-sized and well-designed clinical studies (randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with an appropriate placebo or other strong comparison control or observational studies that control for confounds) (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of fewer symptoms of mucosal irritation induced by Lugol chromoendoscopy among people with esophageal dysplasia and carcinoma treated with a vitamin C solution spray

Pain

No evidence of an effect on pain among people with advanced cancer treated with 10 g oral vitamin C in a mid-sized study

Quality of life and physical function

No evidence of an effect on strength among people with advanced cancer treated with 10 g oral vitamin C in a mid-sized study

Preliminary evidence of better quality of life scores during radiotherapy among people with head and neck cancer treated with chewable ascorbic acid tablets

Oral vitamin C combined with other therapies

Weak evidence of better scores for quality of life and function (physical, cognitive, emotional, and role function), less appetite loss, nausea and vomiting, pain, and fatigue among people with terminal cancer treated with both intravenous and oral vitamin C

Preliminary evidence of lower rates of fungal infection, hemorrhage, or macrophage activation syndrome among people with acute myeloid leukemia treated with supplemental vitamin C and vitamin D

Weak evidence of better appetite, body weight and lean body mass, less fatigue, and better quality of life among people with cancer-related anorexia/cachexia and oxidative stressan imbalance between free radicals and antioxidants in your body in which antioxidant levels are lower than normal; this imbalance can cause harmful oxidation reactions in your body chemistry treated with a diet rich in polyphenols, antioxidants, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and celecoxib

No evidence of an effect on fatigue while participating in 10 weeks of strength training among people with breast cancer treated with vitamins C and E

Weak evidence of less dry mouth (xerostomia) 6 months after radiotherapy among people with head and neck cancer treated with vitamins C and E

Weak evidence of higher iron levels among people with advanced cancer and low iron levels treated with micronised microencapsulated ferric pyrophosphate and ascorbic acid

Symptoms not specific to cancer

Modest evidencesignificant effects in at least three small but well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs), or one or more well-designed, mid-sized clinical studies of reasonably good quality (RCTs or observational studies), or several small studies aggregated into a meta-analysis (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of less anxiety related to stress among people treated with oral vitamin C (not specific to cancer)

Preliminary evidence of less change in body composition during exercising among elderly women treated with oral vitamin C (not specific to cancer)

Modest evidence of higher fat-free mass among middle-aged and older people with higher dietary intakes or plasma levels of vitamin C (not specific to cancer)

Modest evidence of lower fracture risk among men, but not women, with the highest plasma vitamin C concentrations (not specific to cancer)

Modest evidence of lower blood pressure related to stress or exercise among people treated with oral vitamin C (not specific to cancer)

Modest evidence of less depression among people treated with oral vitamin C (not specific to cancer)

Preliminary evidence of lower measures of pain and less nausea and vomiting after surgery among adults treated with oral vitamin C 1 hour before surgery (not specific to cancer)

No evidence of an effect on muscle soreness or muscle strength after a single exercise session among healthy volunteers treated with vitamin C supplements in a combined analysis of studies

Preliminary evidence of a higher rate of penile-vaginal intercourse among healthy young adults treated with oral vitamin C

Modest evidence of lower risk of pulmonary morbidity or organ failure and shorter duration of mechanical ventilation and length of stay in intensive care after surgery among critically ill people treated with vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) and ascorbate (not specific to cancer)

Preliminary evidence of less diabetic peripheral neuropathydamage to the peripheral nerves outside the brain and spinal cord among people treated with DiVFuSS formulation

Commentary

Vitamin C’s role in cancer-related anemia

CancerChoices Senior Clinical Consultant Laura Pole, RN, MSN, OCNS: People with cancer may become anemic for several reasons. One is iron deficiency, the most common nutritional deficiency in advanced cancer patients and the cause of iron-deficiency anemia.88Pappalardo A, Currenti W et al. Effects of micronised microencapsulated ferric pyrophosphate supplementation in patients with advanced cancer and iron deficiency: a single-centre cohort pilot study. Blood Transfusion. 2019 May;17(3):196-199. Diagnosing this kind of anemia involves blood tests, including complete blood count (CBC) and ferritin levels.89Iron deficiency anemia—diagnosis and treatment. Mayo Clinic. January 4, 2022. Viewed June 6, 2023. 

Vitamin C deficiency may also be a common and underrecognized cause of anemia. One study concluded that vitamin C deficiency was linked to anemia, regardless of iron status, as well as inflammation as shown by higher levels of ferritin.90Sehbai A, Asif N. De novo anemia and relationship with vitamin C deficiency and zinc deficiency in a southern Delaware population, a retrospective analysis. Blood. 2015;126(23):4547.

Because vitamin C is capable of turning iron in your blood into a more soluble and therefore more usable form and can also improve iron absorption, vitamin C deficiency may also play a role in iron-deficiency anemia. Because of these effects, for years doctors routinely recommended people take vitamin C along with iron supplements. However, one well-designed research found that the effects of iron supplements on hemoglobin levels and iron stores are no different whether vitamin C is taken with iron or not.91Li N, Zhao G et al. The efficacy and safety of vitamin C for iron supplementation in adult patients with iron deficiency anemia: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Network Open. 2020 Nov 2;3(11):e2023644. Unfortunately, this study did not report the effects of adding vitamin C among the study participants who may have been deficient in vitamin C. We know from studies of other therapies—such as vitamin D—that people with a deficiency may get a benefit from taking supplements, but other people may not. People with vitamin C deficiency who need iron supplementation may benefit from taking vitamin C. This study didn’t investigate this. 

A side note related to iron supplementation: Ferrous sulfate (the standard type of iron prescribed) is poorly absorbed and typically constipating. Ferrous gylcinate or bisglycinate (sometimes called “gentle iron” or “iron chelate”) is far better absorbed and does not cause bowel changes. For this reason, if iron is needed, ferrous glycinate is a preferable form.

Because evidence on whether or not to supplement with vitamin C to manage anemia is inconclusive, we provide some key take-aways based on the best available information:92Li N, Zhao G et al. The efficacy and safety of vitamin C for iron supplementation in adult patients with iron deficiency anemia: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Network Open. 2020 Nov 2;3(11):e2023644; Simonson W. Should vitamin C routinely be given with oral iron supplements? Geriatric Nursing. 2019 May-Jun;40(3):327-328.

  •  Iron is usually well-absorbed, and iron-deficiency anemia typically responds quickly to iron supplements. Before adding another supplement such as vitamin C, check that you are taking the iron supplement correctly for optimal absorption: take it at the right time, not with foods that compete with iron absorption, and avoid interactions with any drugs or other supplements that decrease absorption. Favor ferrous gylcinate or bisglycinate for iron supplementation, as these are absorbed better and are less constipating than ferrous sulfate.
  • Check for and correct a vitamin C deficiency. Ask your doctor or registered dietitian whether increasing vitamin C in your diet would be sufficient to bring your levels to an appropriate range or if they recommend supplementation. Talk to your doctor before starting any supplements. 
  • If you supplement with vitamin C when taking iron, the dose recommended is 200 mg or more of vitamin C for every 30 mg of iron. This dose of vitamin C, especially when combined with iron, may increase your risk of nausea and diarrhea.
  • Some products combining iron and vitamin C tend to be more expensive than separate supplements and may not have an adequate dose of vitamin C to provide benefit. 

Addition from CancerChoices advisor Jen Green, ND, FABNO: Vitamin C deficiency is so common in cancer patients that I would recommend using 500 mg vitamin C orally to treat deficiencies regardless of iron status. “Extensive literature demonstrates that cancer patients experience vitamin C deficiency correlated with reduced oral intake, inflammation, infection, disease processes, and treatments such as radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery.”93Klimant E, Wright H, Rubin D, Seely D, Markman M. Intravenous vitamin C in the supportive care of cancer patients: a review and rational approach. Current Oncology. 2018 Apr;25(2):139-148.

Reducing cancer risk

Is oral vitamin C linked to lower risks of developing cancer or of recurrence? We present the evidence.

Cancer as a whole

No evidence of an effectoverall, one or more studies did not demonstrate that a treatment or intervention led to an expected outcome; this does not always mean that there is no effect in clinical practice, but that the studies may have been underpowered (too few participants) or poorly designed. Larger, well-designed studies provide more confidence in making assessments. on risk of cancer as a whole among people treated with oral vitamin C in large controlled studies

Modest evidencesignificant effects in at least three small but well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs), or one or more well-designed, mid-sized clinical studies of reasonably good quality (RCTs or observational studies), or several small studies aggregated into a meta-analysis (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of a link between low vitamin C levels and risk of cancer as a whole

Bladder cancer

No evidence of an effect on risk of urothelial cell carcinoma among people with higher plasma vitamin C levels in a large study

Breast cancer

Modest evidence of lower risk of recurrence among people with breast cancer taking vitamin C supplements

No evidence of an effect on breast cancer risk among people with higher levels of vitamin C intake from diet and/or supplements in a combined analysis of studies

Preliminary evidencesignificant effects in small or poorly designed clinical studies OR conflicting results in adequate studies but a preponderance of evidence of an effect (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of a link between low vitamin C levels and breast cancer risk

Colorectal cancer

Insufficient evidencepreclinical evidence only OR clinical studies with such poor or unclear methodology that no conclusion can be drawn OR conflicting findings across clinical studies with no preponderance of evidence in one direction; conflicting evidence occurs when studies find conflicting effects (positive effect vs no effect or negative effect) with the same treatment and the same general study population (same cancer type, for example) (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of lower colorectal cancer risk among people with higher levels of vitamin C intake from diet or both diet and supplements, but not supplements alone

Weak evidenceone or more case studies, supported by animal evidence OR small treatment effects of limited clinical significance OR studies with no controls OR weak trends of effects (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of lower risk of colon cancer among people with higher levels of vitamin C intake from diet or supplements, but not both diet and supplements

No evidence of an effect on rectal cancer risk among people with higher levels of vitamin C intake from diet

Preliminary evidence of lower risk of colon cancer among people with higher diet-derived circulating levels of vitamin C

No evidence of an effect on risk of colorectal cancer among people with genetically predicted higher levels of circulating vitamin C levels

Gastrointestinal cancer

Colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer are listed separately.

No evidence of an effect on risk of esophageal, gastric, or liver cancers among people taking oral vitamin C in a combined analysis of studies

Modest evidence of greater regression of precancerous lesions among people with multifocal atrophic gastritis treated with oral vitamin C

Modest evidence of lower risk of esophageal cancer or Barrett’s esophagus—a risk factor for esophageal cancer—among people with the highest levels of dietary vitamin C intake

Preliminary evidence of lower risk of small intestine cancer among people with genetically predicted higher levels of circulating vitamin C

No evidence of an effect on risk of esophageal, stomach, or liver cancer among people with higher levels of vitamin C in several combined analyses of studies

Gynecological cancer

Ovarian cancer is listed separately.

Preliminary evidence of a link between low vitamin C levels and risk of gynecological cancer; we don’t know if low vitamin C levels contribute to cancer risk, or if having cancer leads to low vitamin C levels, or if the link works in both directions

Leukemia

Preliminary evidence of a link between low vitamin C levels and risk of leukemia; we don’t know if low vitamin C levels contribute to cancer risk, or if having cancer leads to low vitamin C levels, or if the link works in both directions

Lung cancer

Good evidencesignificant effects in one large or several mid-sized and well-designed clinical studies (randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with an appropriate placebo or other strong comparison control or observational studies that control for confounds) (this is the CancerChoices definition; other researchers and studies may define this differently) of lower risk of lung cancer among people with higher levels of vitamin C intake from diet, but no evidence of an effect on risk from vitamin C supplements

Weak evidence of lower risk of lung cancer among people with genetically predicted higher levels of circulating vitamin C

Melanoma and other skin cancers

No evidence of an effect on risk of sunburn—a risk factor for skin cancer—or cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma among people with higher intake of vitamin C

No evidence of an effect on risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma among non-Hispanic whites with higher self-report vitamin C intake

Moderately lower risk of melanoma among people with the highest intake of vitamin C in their diets

Mesothelioma

Preliminary evidence of a link between lower vitamin C levels and risk of mesothelioma; we don’t know if low vitamin C levels contribute to mesothelioma risk, or if having mesothelioma leads to low vitamin C levels, or if the link works in both directions

Multiple myeloma

Preliminary evidence of a link between lower vitamin C levels and risk of multiple myeloma; we don’t know if low vitamin C levels contribute to multiple myeloma risk, or if having multiple myeloma leads to low vitamin E levels, or if the link works in both directions

Ovarian cancer

No evidence of an effect on risk of ovarian cancer among women with higher dietary vitamin C intake in a large combined analysis of studies

Pancreatic cancer

No evidence of an effect on risk of pancreatic cancer among people taking oral vitamin C in a combined analysis of studies

No evidence of an effect on risk of pancreatic cancer among people with higher diet-derived circulating levels of vitamin C in a combined analysis of studies

Prostate cancer

No evidence of an effect on prostate cancer risk among people with higher levels of vitamin C intake from diet and/or supplements in very large studies

No evidence of an effect on prostate cancer risk among people with genetically predicted higher levels of circulating vitamin C levels in a very large analysis

Vitamin C combined with other therapies

Weak evidence of lower cancer mortality among people without cancer at baseline eating the highest levels of antioxidants in foods

Preliminary evidence of lower risk of cervical cancer among women with the highest supplement and dietary intakes of vitamin A, beta -carotene, and vitamin C

Preliminary evidence of lower incidence of sunburn—a risk factor for skin cancer—among volunteers treated with vitamin C and vitamin E

No evidence of an effect on recurrence of colorectal polyps after removal of at least one colorectal polyp among people free of polyps treated with vitamins C and E

Modest evidence of greater regression of multifocal nonmetaplastic atrophy or intestinal metaplasia among people with multifocal atrophic gastritis without intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia treated with vitamin C (ascorbic acid) and beta-carotene

Weak evidence of normalization of CA-125 levels and no evidence of recurrence after cytoreduction surgery among 2 women with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer treated with oral vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, coenzyme Q-10, and a multivitamin/mineral complex, plus intravenous vitamin C in addition to chemotherapy

Helpful link

Keep reading about oral vitamin C

Author

Nancy Hepp, MS

Lead Researcher and Program Manager
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Ms. Hepp is a researcher and communicator who has been writing and editing educational content on varied health topics for more than 20 years. She serves as lead researcher, program manager, and writer for CancerChoices. Her graduate work in research and cognitive psychology, her master’s degree in instructional design, and her certificate in web design have all guided her in writing and presenting information for a wide variety of audiences and uses. Nancy’s service as faculty development coordinator in the Department of Family Medicine at Wright State University also provided experience in medical research, plus insights into medical education and medical care from the professional’s perspective.

Nancy Hepp, MS Lead Researcher and Program Manager

Laura Pole, RN, MSN, OCNS

Senior Clinical Consultant
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Laura Pole is senior clinical consultant for CancerChoices. Laura is an oncology clinical nurse specialist who has been providing integrative oncology clinical care, navigation, consultation, and education services for over 40 years. She is the co-creator and co-coordinator of the Integrative Oncology Navigation Training at Smith Center for Healing and the Arts in Washington, DC. Laura also manages the “Media Watch Cancer News That You Can Use” listserv for Smith Center/Commonweal. In her role as a palliative care educator and consultant, Laura has served as statewide Respecting Choices Faculty for the Virginia POST (Physician Orders for Scope of Treatment) Collaborative as well as provided statewide professional education on palliative and end-of-life care for the Virginia Association for Hospices and Palliative Care.

For CancerChoices, Laura curates content and research, networks with clinical and organizational partners, brings awareness and education of integrative oncology at professional and patient conferences and programs, and translates research into information relevant to the patient experience as well as clinical practice.

Laura sees her work with CancerChoices as a perfect alignment of all her passions, knowledge and skills in integrative oncology care. She is honored to serve you.

Laura Pole, RN, MSN, OCNS Senior Clinical Consultant

Reviewer

Jen Green, ND, FABNO

Naturopathic oncologist and CancerChoices advisor
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Dr. Green is a naturopathic physician who is board-certified in naturopathic oncology (FABNO). Dr. Green is also a cofounder/research director for Knowledge in Integrative Oncology Website, a nonprofit website that harvests up-to-date research in integrative oncology to support evidence-informed decision making. Dr. Green has published scientific articles in journals such as the American Urology Association Update SeriesJournal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine and Natural Medicine Journal.

Jen Green, ND, FABNO Naturopathic oncologist and CancerChoices advisor

Last update: January 29, 2024

Last full literature review: January 2023

CancerChoices provides information about integrativein cancer care, a patient-centered approach combining the best of conventional care, self care, and evidence-informed complementary care in an integrated plan cancer care. We review complementaryin cancer care, complementary care involves the use of therapies intended to enhance or add to standard conventional treatments; examples include supplements, mind-body approaches such as yoga or psychosocialtherapy, and acupuncture therapies and self carelifestyle actions and behaviors that may impact cancer outcomes; examples include eating health-promoting foods, limiting alcohol, increasing physical activity, and managing stress practices to help patients and professionals explore and integrate the best combination of conventionalthe cancer care offered by conventionally trained physicians and most hospitals; examples are chemotherapy, surgery, and radiotherapy and complementary therapies and practices for each person.

Our staff have no financial conflicts of interest to declare. We receive no funds from any manufacturers or retailers gaining financial profit by promoting or discouraging therapies mentioned on this site.

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